Lauren Carter

Biography

Lauren Carter graduated from Salem State University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology in 2006. She received her Master’s degree in Severe Special Education with teaching licensure in Massachusetts in 2008 through Simmons College. Lauren completed BCBA coursework through the University of Massachusetts-Boston and became certified as a BCBA in September 2013. Lauren began her career with Melmark New England in July of 2006. Lauren currently serves as the Director of School Age Services; overseeing students aged 16-22. Lauren has been conducting research, training and developing individualized programs in dental desensitization to increase student success with routine dental exams. Through various experiences with attending medical/dental appointments with individuals and the difficulties presented, Lauren became interested in medical and dental desensitization for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder to increase access to care. Lauren has presented her research at regional and national conferences and has been published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Abstract

Background: Many persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities resist basic dental care leading to poor oral health. The present study evaluated the effects of a dental desensitization intervention for two students who had autism spectrum disorder and would not tolerate tooth cleaning and examination.

Methods: Participants were two male students who attended a residential school for children and youth who had neurodevelopmental disorders. Baseline and intervention sessions were conducted within a simulated dental setting within the school. Measurement was taken on the percentage of independently completed steps of task analysis for a general dental exam. Baseline assessed student’s responding when presented with the full task analysis given no prompting or reinforcement. Intervention consisted of gradually exposing the students to steps within a desensitization hierarchy, reinforcing compliance, and progressively fading-eliminating reinforcement using a changing criterion design. Familiar care-providers implemented baseline and intervention sessions.

Results: Both students completed intervention successfully and one of them was able to tolerate procedures during visits to a dentist’s office. The task analysis is able to be modified by breaking steps down further to increase success. Probe sessions indicated carryover effects of teaching shown through each participants ability to skip sets within the intervention.

Conclusions: Dental desensitization through the use of graduated exposure, reinforcement and reinforcement fading was successful in increasing toleration to general dental examinations increasing access to care. Children with autism spectrum disorder who display dental avoidance can acquire skills to tolerate basic dental examination procedures. Further research is needed to determine generalization effects from intervention as well as the effects of these intervention strategies in desensitization of other dental and medical procedures.

Peter D Fine

Biography

Peter Fine is currently working as a Senior Clinical Teaching Fellow at UCL Eastman Dental Institute, London, UK. He is Director of the Master’s Degree in Sports Dentistry-Oral Health in Sport, the first Master’s degree in Sports Dentistry. He is Deputy Director of the Restorative Dental Practice Programme, with responsibilities for the MSc students’ supervision. Peter has recently published a textbook for undergraduate & postgraduate dental students as well as sports medicine practitioners, on Sports Dentistry. He received his Ph.D. from UCL, with his study looking into the impact of postgraduate training on general dental practitioners’ confidence and its influence on future learning. He is an international speaker on both Sports Dentistry and Postgraduate Dental Education.

Abstract

Sports Medicine contains a wealth of knowledge about the health, wellbeing, and performance of elite athletes. Oral health in these individuals has received much less attention until recently, although research studies were published half a century ago. The high level of dental disease found in athletes has led to an increase in the amount of screening of elite athletes in order to alert them and their medical team of any potential problems. The literature is littered with anecdotal evidence of elite athletes missing major sporting events due to oral health issues. This presentation will explore the relationship between poor oral health and its impact on athletic performance. Studies undertaken during recent Olympic Games and beyond have indicated a rise in dental diseases in athletes, beyond what could be expected of a similarly aged non-athlete. The introduction of screening programs in professional sport in the UK has been shown to highlight the amount of dental disease present, enabled dental staff to support athletes with oral health issues, provide valuable information to medical staff and prevents serious dental issues before they affect performance. As dental screening becomes more prevalent with elite athletes, the incidence of poor athletic performance linked to oral health issues will decline. Dental screening can take place, either in the dental surgery environment or on-site at the training facility, either way, the screening of oral health issues seems fully justified within sports, given the high prevalence of treatable conditions seen in dental health studies.

Keynote Speaker

Michel Bou Chaaya

Title: Perio mind and ortho hands

Time: 11:45 AM-12:30 PM

Michel Bou Chaaya

Biography

Michel Bou Chaaya received his Orthodontics degree at Pierre & Marie Curie University, his TMJ Disorders and Occlusion Specialty degree at Rene Descartes University in Paris, in 1995. He is a member of the World Federation of Orthodontists, the American Association of Orthodontists, and an Invisalign Provider. He is an international speaker since 2001, in the USA, Europe, and the Middle East.

Abstract

Is it safe to put braces and to start aligning immediately crowded teeth? This study aims to review our approach in treating a crowding, especially in the lower arch. What is the concept of the ALVEOLAR CORRIDOR? Can we expand it horizontally? What happens when we move incisors labially or lingually beyond the limits of the alveolar corridor? Is our orthodontic treatment responsible for gum recession during or after the treatment? Finally, cases with Self-Ligating Brackets and Reproximation show that we can align crowded teeth in a fast and safe way without perio surgery.

Nand Lal

Biography

Nand Lal Passed BDS from King George’s Medical College, Lucknow in 1991. Passed MDS from King George’s Medical College, Lucknow in 1996. Worked as a faculty member in Sarjug Dental College, Darbhanga, Bihar from 15th March 1997 to 14th March 2002 (forenoon). Joined as Assistant Professor in King George’s Medical College, Lucknow from 14th March 2002 (afternoon) to 13th March 2006. Promoted to Associate Professor on 14th March 2006 and remained till 24th March 2011. Promoted to Professor, from 25th March 2011 to till date and became head of the department from 1st July 2016 to till date.

Abstract

Oral sub-mucous fibrosis (OSMF) is one of the most prevalent oral potentially malignant disorders in the Indian subcontinent. The most common etiological factor related to the incidence of OSMF is consumption of tobacco and areca-nut chewing. Oral hygiene and health is an important part of an individual’s general health, affecting all domains of life: functional, aesthetic, psychological, social, physical, nutritional, and even psychosocial. Oral health and hygiene are usually compromised in patients with OSMF, primarily because of reduced mouth opening (trismus) and fibrosis. Special care and counseling are important for periodontal maintenance therapy of patients with OSMF. A prospective study was planned to evaluate the quality of life of patients with OSMF undergoing periodontal treatment at the Department of Periodontology, King George’s Medical University, Lucknow. The patients were enrolled and regular follow-up was done. Patients were enrolled after obtaining informed consent. The study was conducted on 128 subjects aged between 24 and 68 years. A set of questionnaires were administered at the time of enrolment, 1 month after treatment and 3 months after treatment. A questionnaire was developed to evaluate the periodontal status, oral hygiene practices, history of tobacco and areca-nut chewing and quality of life including all the domains. UW-QOL, WHO BREF, and OHIP-14 questionnaire were also applied to evaluate the quality of life of the patients. The periodontal health and quality of life tool developed were named as “KGMU-Perio assessment tool”. The developed questionnaire was validated for internal consistency, reliability and validity tests. Cronbach’s alpha was calculated principal component analysis was performed. The KGMU-Perio assessment tool was cross-validated using spearman co-efficient. The results show that the developed questionnaire is an effective tool for the assessment of QOL of patients with OSMF, and there is a significant improvement in oral health and overall QOL of subjects after periodontal therapy.

Keynote Speaker

Ege Dogan

Title: Orthodontic procedures in cleft lip and palate patients

Time: 14:00 PM-14:45 PM

Ege Dogan

Biography

Ege Dogan DDS Ph.D. had finished the dentistry faculty with the thesis named ‘The evaluation of the patients with a cleft in Aegean Region in Turkey between the years 2000-2011’ and in Ege University, Faculty of Dentistry, Izmir, Turkey. She did her Ph.D. with a thesis named ‘The Evaluation of Soft and Hard Tissues by Using Alt-RAMEC Protocol for Maxillary Protraction in Patients with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate’ in Ege University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, Izmir, Turkey. Now she is working in her private clinic in Izmir, Turkey. She is a member of EOS, AAO, WFO, TOD, and DDYD.

 

Abstract

Cleft lip and palate anomaly is a congenital malformation caused by morphologic changes, altered growth factors, and absolute tissue deficiency in the hard palate and abnormal tissues in the maxillary palatal region. Cleft lip and palate affect lots of people. In  all over the world, it is seen  1/800-1000, while it is 1/800 in Turkey. The aim of the cleft treatment is to eliminate the cleft sigma of the face. Patients with the cleft lip and palate deformity may experience feeding, hearing, speaking and malformed or missing tooth problems. Cleft patients need interdisciplinary treatment approaches.  These patients may require orthodontic treatment in different periods of their lives, from birth to adulthood. In every dental period; newborn, deciduous, mixed, permanent and adult, orthodontics have different treatment approaches. The success in cleft patients depends on using the correct treatment methods in each period. Different forms of irregularities in the position of maxillary segments are observed in infants with cleft lip and palate. Preoperative orthopedic treatment can be used to realign maxillary segments and to reduce alveolar cleft width. An ideal arch form is considered to have a positive effect in terms of normal growth and development but tissue deficiencies, abnormal muscle forces, and scar tissues as a result of operations have negative effects on the maxillary arch form, maxillary arch dimensions and maxillary growth in sagittal, transversal and vertical directions. Even the mandibular growth and development is normal, mandibular arch form and arch dimensions can be affected due to the irregularities of the maxillary arch. It causes several functional and esthetic problems due to its structure affecting both hard and soft tissues involving the nose, lips, alveolus, and palate.

The purpose of this article: Is to exhibit orthodontic and orthopedic approaches from newborn up to adult, and to assess the efficiency of orthodontic management of children with a cleft lip and palate in Turkey.

Conclusion: This anomaly has significant effects on the facial morphology, function, growth and development of the individual, which requires a detailed study of the dental and craniofacial characteristics. So, it is very important to have true treatment approaches in every stage and in all disciplines for the effective treatment results for cleft patients.

Daniel Fernandez

Biography

Daniel Fernandez graduated as a dentist in his native country, Mexico, in 1990. In 1994 he moved to New Zealand became a dental therapist and practiced dental therapy at the Waitemata District Health Board in Auckland. He has a Bachelor of Health Science in Oral Health from AUT and a postgraduate diploma in Public Health.  In 2009 he was employed by AUT as a lecturer and in 2016 he became Head of the Oral Health Department. He is a dental therapist member of the Health Practitioners’ Disciplinary Tribunal in New Zealand. In April 2019, he was nominated as a member of the Board of the New Zealand Dental and Oral Health Therapists’ Association. He is also a member of the College of Oral Health Academics of New Zealand and Australia. He has presented topics relevant to the teaching of oral health throughout New Zealand and Australia.

Abstract

Constructive feedback, written or verbal, should be the cornerstone of clinical teaching. Clinical teachers often believe they are effective teachers and provide the students with little or no feedback about their clinical practice. Teachers have an obligation to ensure that students are guided to ensure that they perform well in all clinical aspects of their professional practice. Giving and receiving feedback should be a regular practice as clinical teachers and should address aspects of the students’ general clinical performance. It is fundamental that we develop the skills and competency to provide constructive feedback in order to encourage students to reflect and identify their strengths, weaknesses and learning needs. This also helps us to reflect on our own performance as clinical teachers. The feedback should be direct and specific and should address the positive and negative aspects of the students’ clinical performance. It should be given at the time of, or soon after, an event has been observed. One of the benefits of providing constructive feedback is that it encourages clinical teacher vigilance about student progress while allowing students to reflect on their own practice in order to identify areas for improvement. Without constructive feedback, students’ best practice will not be identified and reinforced which may, in turn, lead to underperformance that is not corrected. In this presentation, I will be talking about different types of constructive feedback that clinical teachers might employ to promote student self-reflection and improved clinical learning.

Sahar Zaki

Biography

Sahar Zaki, Professor of Fixed Prosthodontics, Faculty of Oral and Dental Medicine, Cairo University, Currently Consultant in King Abdulla Medical City, Saudi Arabia got her bachelor degree in 1987 from Cairo University, masters’ degree in 1994, Ph.D. in 2001 from the same university. Published many types of research in her field, supervised many masters thesis in her specialty

Abstract

Several decades ago, esthetic dental needs were not on top of patient interest, but recently esthetics has taken its rightful place along with functionality due to the increasing knowledge of the field and also advancement in materials and technologies. Consumers now are aware of the effect of the aesthetics of their teeth, on their wellbeing, their acceptance by others, their success in work and in relationships, and their emotional stability informed by books and ongoing media coverage. These same consumers have their unique cases, which depend on pre-existing dental condition, extraoral and intraoral factors, knowledge, expectations, and even financial boundaries. All the previous factors along with clinical and laboratory materials and methods affect the final esthetic outcome of dental treatment. This presentation will discuss all the previous factors, which aim at reaching the esthetic treatment needed by both patients and dentists.

Manal Mohammed Shira

Biography

Manal Mohammed Shira is a consultant in advanced restorative dentistry, advisor for the general directorate of the hospital administration in the ministry of health in Saudi Arabia She has built this model after years of experience in research, evaluation, teaching, and administration both in hospital and education institutions. She shared in many conferences national &international conferences as a speaker. And in many community projects

Abstract

Health care has changed dramatically by the scientific blend of computers and telecommunication. The result of which is the telemedicine, an innovative field that involves the exchange of clinical information and images over remote distances for consultation and treatment planning by linking them with the specialists in larger communities. Teledentistry has increased the patient access to dental care, by improving the quality of care, and cost-effectiveness. It is also very useful in long-distance clinical training, continuing education, screening, and dentist-laboratory communication. In this presentation, an attempt has been made to review the origin, rationale, scope, the basics and requirements for teledentistry, along with the current evidence that exists in the literature and the future of this alternative and innovative method of delivering dental care.

Speaker

Roaa Talal

Title: Dental myth or fact

Time: 16:45 PM -17:15 PM

Roaa Talal

Biography

Roaa Talal is an energetic and vibrant Dentist who believes that prevention is the key to excellent oral health. She is originally from Saudi Arabia and moved to UAE since 2005 where she started her journey and completed all the requirements for the degree in Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS) at University of Sharjah College of Dentistry. She is a member of the American associates, UAE medical association and the Saudi Dental association, keeping her knowledge up to level with the latest technology and researches in science to ensure to develop the ultimate care to her patients. Dr. Roaa is currently continuing her master’s degree in education in health business management and always keening to have updates in Dentistry. She lives by the words of Mother Teresa: “We shall never know all the good that a simple smile can do.”

Abstract

Statement of the Problem: Over the years, dentistry has evolved from an imprecise practice based on folk cures to structured medical discipline that relies on science and technology.  Although modern dentistry has come along the way there are still many dental myths that are passed on by word of mouth. Social media as well had a big role that can spread rumors to thousands without knowing the real scientific evidence behind it. Here is the truth about some common dental misconceptions speaking about genetic facts, sugar, oil pulling, check-ups, pregnancy, teeth whitening and wisdom teeth. The main aim is to recognize our role as medical professionals as a dentist to spread education and how to deliver this knowledge to our patients. 

Keynote Speaker

Amine El Choueiri

Title: Difficult clinical situations, teeth or implants

Time: 09:30 AM-10:15 AM

Amine El Choueiri

Biography

Amine El Choueiri born in Lebanon (1972), he Graduated (BDS) from the Lebanese University in 1995 and he got a Certificate of Oral Biology in 1996 and a Certificate of Oral Surgery in 1997 from Paris 7 University, and a University Diploma in Periodontology in 1998 from Paris 6 University. Has a private practice limited to implants, periodontics and oral and Laser surgery since 1998, He is an ITI Fellow and Study Club Director, Speaker in different local, regional and International Meetings. Now he is working at Choueiri Surgery Clinic for 20 years now as owner and director.

Abstract

In our daily practice, we are frequently faced with complicated cases where we have to take difficult decisions in order to provide to our patients the best treatment they deserve.

One of the first questions, we should ask ourselves should be: save or extract? But then how long would compromised teeth last if treated properly? And what is the best way to replace hopeless teeth? How long do dental implants last? How can we manage difficult cases for implant placement? Are there any limits for our implant treatments? As a conclusion, the golden rule should always be to try to save natural teeth, and to replace hopeless or missing teeth by dental implants. Knowing that in some cases we have to spare our patients from unnecessary risky treatments and provide them with “classical”, “old fashion” therapies.

Ranjit Kumar Patil

Biography

Ranjitkumar Patil is presently working as Professor & Head in the department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, King George Medical University, Lucknow. He did graduation and post graduation in subject of Oral Medicine & Radiology from Government Dental College Nagpur, India, in the year 1992 and 1998 respectively. He has an enormous clinical and radiological understanding with more than 20 years of UG & PG teaching experience. He has more than 50 national & international publications in reputed and indexed journals. He is also actively involved in Ph.D. teaching and lectured in different institutions in India & Abroad with special interest on CBCT.

Abstract

Cone beam computerized technology (CBCT) offers 3-dimensional visualization of complex Oro-facial region with more precise information compared to analog/digital radiographs. It is an accurate tool for various pathologies of the oral-maxillofacial region, with lower radiation doses than computerized tomography (CT). CBCT has gained more popularity in a short span of time and clinicians are rapidly realizing the significant advantages of CBCT imaging.

This presentations would be elaborating on Basic Principles of CBCT and Application in Dentistry, Implant planning, Imaging of Oro-facial Structures, Importance of third Party software and use of CBCT in Medical Field.

Vinay Kumar Gupta

Biography

Vinay Kumar Gupta working as a Professor in King George Medical University, INDIA

Abstract

Fluorosis is a slow, progressive, the crippling malady, a public health problem which affects every organ, tissue, and cell in the body, linked to excess intake of fluoride through drinking water/food products/industrial emission over a long period and results in health complaints having overlapping manifestations with several other diseases. The primary adverse effects associated with chronic, excess fluoride intake are dental and skeletal fluorosis.

In India, more than one lakh villages and over 10 million people stand to face disability due to high fluoride content in water. Fluorosis affects children and women the most. Pregnant mothers are the most vulnerable to this disease. People are also affected by Neurological problems, thyroid imbalance, and nutritional deficiencies and arthritis-like joint pain, etc.

Rajasthan is most affected by Fluorosis, followed by Telangana, Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, and Uttar Pradesh etc. Patients with dental fluorosis not complaining much as for them it is discoloration of the tooth but they do not know that fluoride affected or affecting their other body part. My concern for is to prevent those crippling complication.

The holistic approach includes Quantitative Chemical Risk Assessment followed by Health promotion, Community participation, early detection and treatment at community level, the introduction of appropriate nutritional supplements (especially malnutrition children) and popularization of indigenous defluoridation techniques etc.  

Tsuyoshi Shimo

Biography

Tsuyoshi Shimo completed his DDS in the Hiroshima University of Dental School in the year 1988-1994 and he finished his Ph.D. (Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery) at Okayama University in the year of 1994-1998  in 1998 Dentist in Kibi-kogen Medical Rehabilitation Center and 2000 Post-doctoral fellow, University of Pennsylvania, Dental School, PA USA and 2003 Assistant Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Okayama University and 2013 Associate Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Okayama University and 2018 Professor, Division of Reconstructive Surgery for Oral and Maxillofacial Region, School of Dentistry, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido

Abstract

Because oral squamous cell carcinoma shows various pathological conditions, it is misdiagnosed as periodontitis, extraction of the adjacent tooth, gingival curettage is carried out and experiences transition to advanced cancer accompanied by jaw bone infiltration. Our clinical data so far revealed that pathologically-proven medullary bone invasion was found to be key independent prognostic factors in gingival squamous cell carcinoma.

When cancer cells invade into the bone marrow, various humoral factors produced from cancer cells activate osteoclasts directly or through mesenchymal cells, thereby promoting bone destruction and being released from the bone The growth factor further promotes the proliferation of cancer cells and a negative vicious circle is established.

In the process of investigating for the spatiotemporal expression and function of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF / CCN2) and hedgehog in the endochondral bone formation process and tooth the development process, CCN2 and hedgehog are involved in cell proliferation and differentiation and their expression is not expressed in normal mucosal epithelium, but it has been found that it is expressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells with cancelation.

In this report, I will introduce cases showing misdiagnosed gingival cancer as periodontitis in clinical experience, and reconstruction of jawbone using custom-made titanium mesh tray with particulate cancellous bone and marrow (PCBM) and implants after jaw bone segmental resection. On the other hand, in basic research, I would like to report on the influence and mechanism of cancer-induced bone destruction targeting CCN2 and hedgehog-related signals, including recent findings.

Keynote Speaker

Manal Mohammed Shira

Title: Medical Errors

Time: 13:45 PM-14:30 PM

Manal Mohammed Shira

Biography

Manal Mohammed Shira is a consultant in advanced restorative dentistry, advisor for the general directorate of the hospital administration in ministry of health in Saudi Arabia She has built this model after years of experience in research, evaluation, teaching and administration both in hospital and education institutions. She shared in many conferences national &international conferences as speaker. And in many community projects

Abstract

Health care has changed dramatically by the scientific blend of computers and telecommunication. The result of which is the telemedicine, an innovative field that involves the exchange of clinical information and images over remote distances for consultation and treatment planning by linking them with the specialists in larger communities.. Tele dentistry has increased the patient access to dental care, by improving the quality of care, and the cost effectiveness. It is also very useful in long-distance clinical training, continuing education, screening, and dentist-laboratory communication. In this presentation, an attempt has been made to review the origin, rationale, scope, the basics and requirements for tele-dentistry, along with the current evidence that exists in the literature and the future of this alternative and innovative method of delivering dental care.

Kariem M Elhelow

Biography

Kariem M Elhelow BDS., MS., Ph.D., is working a Consultant of Implant and Maxillofacial Prosthodontics, in King Abdullah Medical City, Makkah, Saudi Arabia. He worked as a prosthodontist in Alexandria University as well as Salametek Dental Centers. Elhelow received his BDS, and MS from Alexandria University, and his Ph.D. from Cairo University, Egypt. He is also a fellow of the ICOI. He is an author and international public speaker lecturing on the implant, maxillofacial prosthodontics, occlusion, and digital dentistry.

Abstract

Even in the top ranked dental schools, the task of optimizing teeth contacts remains challenging for many dental students and practitioners. The health of teeth, periodontium, and the musculoskeletal complex are closely related to occlusal stability. Dental occlusion is something far beyond the simple contact of the opposing occlusal surfaces; a point that twisted the topic into one of the most complicated puzzles in dentistry. The thorough gnathological methodologies described in literature made the practice of occlusion even more intimidating. Understanding the biomechanics of jaw and teeth movements makes the objectives of occlusal rehabilitation very vibrant and easy to practice.

The purpose of this article: is to set a path for understanding and practicing the core occlusal principles in a simple, yet in-depth way. Relying on the evidence-based core would provide a context for showing that occlusion is not as complicated as literature might reflect

Conclusion: Keeping a clear picture of what a healthy occlusion should be like, is very rewarding to both the patient and the clinician, with the added value of predictability, comfort, function, and aesthetics to the dental treatment.

Peter D Fine

Biography

Peter Fine is currently working as a Senior Clinical Teaching Fellow at UCL Eastman Dental Institute, London, UK. He is Director of the Master’s Degree in Sports Dentistry-Oral Health in Sport, the first Master’s degree in Sports Dentistry. He is Deputy Director of the Restorative Dental Practice Programme, with responsibilities for the MSc students’ supervision. Peter has recently published a text-book for undergraduate & postgraduate dental students as well as sports medicine practitioners, on Sports Dentistry. He received his PhD from UCL, with his study looking into the impact of postgraduate training on general dental practitioners’ confidence and its influence on future learning. He is an international speaker on both Sports Dentistry and Postgraduate Dental Education.

Abstract

Background: Increasing confidence through learning has the potential to change General Dental Practitioners’ (GDPs) perception of clinical practice. By examining how changes in confidence influence the clinical practice of two cohorts of GDPs, during and following an extended period of postgraduate training; we show the importance of confidence and that a lack of confidence is a primary reason why GDPs attend postgraduate training courses.

Methods: A mixed method approach was adopted for this study. Quantitative data was collected via a series of linked questionnaires; qualitative data were collected using focus group discussions, interviews, and contemporaneous field notes. The analysis was undertaken using SPSS software and a phenomenological approach respectively.

Results: 144 GDPs started the program; 25 (17.4%) successfully completed the Master’s degree. Following an initial drop in confidence, participants indicated increased confidence in their ability to undertake the dental procedure, which lead to an increase in confidence in communication skills, and their ability to undertake complex restorative procedures. This lead to greater treatment acceptance by patients resulting in better ‘job satisfaction’.

Conclusions: A sense of confidence is central to personal development and on-going study, leading to: i) an improved capability to perform tasks (competence), ii) confidence is a product of the relationship and trust of those people associated with the individual/professional and iii) the correct level of the challenge is important to confidence.

As the GDPs became more confident, their motivation for ongoing learning was enhanced. The issue of confidence has not been looked at in postgraduate dentistry but it is well recognized in medical education fields.

Yan Liu

Biography

Yan Liu, Female, Born in 1989, China, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Preventive Dentistry, College of Stomatology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710004, China

Abstract

Background: To understand and analyze the caries status of children with disabilities in special schools from 4 to 15 years old in some parts of Shaanxi Province, and to provide evidence for the prevention and treatment of dental caries in children with disabilities.

Methods: A total of 580 children with disabilities from 4 to 15 years old in 6 special schools in Shaanxi Province were selected using cluster sampling methods. First, we carried out the oral examination of the sampled population, and filled in the questionnaire to collect data, and used SPSS 17.0 for data statistics and analysis. The operator performed a consistency check with a kappa value of 0.82.

Results: Among deciduous teeth, the prevalence of tooth caries was 46.50%; the mean dmft was 1.62 ± 2.53; the rate of caries unfilled was 94.29%; the rate of the missing teeth was 4.32%; the rate of the filling teeth was 1.39%. Among permanent tooth, the prevalence of tooth caries was 31.83%; the mean DMFT was 0.76 ± 1.48; the rate of caries unfilled was 87.71%; the rate of the missing teeth was 8.90%; the rate of the filling teeth was 3.39%. Among the tested children, caries rate of 11 to 13 years old was 41.10%, while the caries rate of 5 years old was 58.23%. The rate of pit and groove closure of the first permanent molar was 0.67.

Conclusions: The prevalence of tooth caries of children with disabilities in Shaanxi The province is high, and the proportion of caries without filling was high; the caries of deciduous teeth are more serious than those of permanent teeth; the level of oral health care for children with disabilities is low. Dental medical workers and related departments should pay more attention to the disabled children.

Xiuzhi Fei

Biography

Xiuzhi Fei, Female, Born in 1990, China, Ph.D. Candidate Department of Preventive Dentistry, College of Stomatology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710004, China

Abstract

Backgrounds: Pit and fissure sealants with antibacterial and remineralization properties have broad application prospects in caries prevention. The objectives were to develop a novel pit and fissure sealant containing CaF2 nanoparticles (nCaF2) and dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM) and investigate the effects on dental plaque microcosm biofilm response and the fluoride ion release ability.

Methods: Helioseal F was used as a control. A series of light-cured sealants were formulated with nCaF2 and DMAHDM at different mass fractions. Fluoride ion concentrations released from the sealants were measured. Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biofilms were grown on sealant disks, and metabolic activity, lactic acid production, colony-forming units (CFU), live/dead assay of biofilms was measured. Statistical analysis was conducted with one-way analysis of variance and Turkey’s statistic performed by SPSS 18.0.

Results: The cumulative F concentration of sealants with 20% nCaF2 was significantly higher than the commercial sealant (p < 0.05). The sealant with DMAHDM and nCaF2 reduced the biofilm metabolic activity, lactic acid production (p < 0.05), reduced the S. mutans biofilm CFU by 4 logs and was covered primarily by dead bacteria with red staining.

Conclusions: The use of double agents (nCaF2 and antibacterial DMAHDM) in pit and fissure sealant achieved high fluoride release ability and strong antibacterial performance. It is promising to prevent pit and fissure caries and promote the remineralization of enamel and dentin.

Joao Eduardo Gomes-Filho

Biography

Gomes-Filho is a Professor in Endodontics and his research is focused on the biomaterials, regeneration, and interrelationship between oral infection and systemic conditions. Recently he is also focusing on the interrelationship between probiotics administration and apical periodontitis development. He has a long carrier as Endodontics Professor and is accredited by Brazilian National Research Council.

Abstract

Backgrounds: Probiotics are microorganisms that when administered inadequate amounts confer benefits to the health of the host and may interfere in the health-disease process. The aim of the present the investigation was to evaluate the relationship between systemic administration of probiotic and resorption/inflammation process of apical periodontitis (AP).

Methods: Twenty-four male Wistar rats were used. Apical Periodontitis was induced in the lower left/right first molars. The animals were arranged into three groups: Control, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus acidophilus. Probiotics was orally administered for gavage (109 colony-forming units (CFU) diluted 5 mL of water for 30 days (during the development of PA). On 30 days, the animals were euthanized and the jaws were removed for AP immune-histopathological evaluation focusing on receptor activator of NF-?B ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) analysis. The data were statistically analyzed (significance was 5%).

Results: The inflammatory infiltrate and the immunostaining for RANKL and TRAP in PA were lower in probiotic groups when compared to the control (p <0.05). It was observed that OPG was more immunolabled in the Lactobacillus acidophilus group than in the Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Control group (p <0.05).

Conclusion: Supplementation with probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus acidophilus) had a significant effect reducing inflammation and bone resorption in apical periodontitis.

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